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The Alumni Association of The University of Western Ontario is proud to serve and represent more than a quarter million alumni around the world.

We are committed to delivering the finest alumni experience, in keeping with our continued number one ranking as "Canada's best student experience”.

Student Success Centre

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The Student Success Centre is here to help with each step of your journey to a successful future. Our mission is to facilitate the development of career, educational, and life competencies for students and alumni through programs and services that guide successful transitions, foster local and global citizenship, promote leadership opportunities, encourage personal growth, deliver career resources, and ignite active engagement.

Description

Computer Science

Computer science provides a foundation enabling graduates to adapt to new technologies and new ideas in an information-driven world. The work of computer scientists falls into three categories: a) designing and building software; b) developing effective ways to solve computing problems, such as storing information in databases, sending data over networks, or providing new approaches to security problems; and c) devising new and better ways of using computers and addressing particular challenges in diverse areas such as game development, medical imaging, social and mobile computing, or bioinformatics.

The Department of Computer Science offers degrees in computer science featuring special course sequences in the third and fourth years for the fundamental areas of computer science (databases, operating systems, computer networks and software project management) as well as special topics courses in the emerging areas of the discipline (eg. software law, e-commerce, distributed applications management and DNA computing).

Skills

Discipline specific knowledge is only one of the many benefits of pursuing an undergraduate degree. However, this knowledge alone is not enough to prepare you for entering the world of work. You will discover that the content of your degree does not restrict your job opportunities.

Being aware of the transferable skills you've developed throughout your studies will better prepare you for entering the job market and allow you to articulate the skills that are so valued by employers.

Knowledge Skills

  • A comprehensive understanding of the processes involved in the storage, transmission and transformation of information in the context of modern electronic technology

Communication Skills

  • The ability to present your thoughts clearly and intelligently in written statements

Organization Skills

  • An ability to prepare written presentations and reports using current data and technology

Management Skills

  • Logical thinking skills and the ability to lead and interact with a variety of people with different approaches and personal and professional backgrounds


For a more complete list of transferable skills click here.


Introduction

Did you know that there are over 2 million job titles and over 900 industries in Canada? That is a lot of possible career options! Understanding the Canadian economy and the types of jobs that are available is one of the best ways to begin your career search.

Students often report feeling limited by their degree choice and worry that they may not have many viable career options. Although your degree can point you in a career direction, it will not necessarily determine the type of job you can pursue. Unlike many college programs, your undergraduate degree is not intended to train you for one specific job. Some students may feel frustrated by this, but the great news is that your degree opens up many more opportunities than you may think!

Employers today are looking for graduates with transferable skills and people who have a sense of where they fit into the world of work. Because of this, it is really important to think beyond your degree when making a career decision. You want to consider all of your interests, the skills you would like to use, what fits with your personality, and the values that you have.

Determining your career path requires a lot of research, both personal and occupational. It's almost impossible to make a career decision if you haven't invested time in both of these things. This section will get you started and will showcase some popular industries and occupational areas related to your degree.

Business and Financial

This sector comprises establishments primarily engaged in financial transactions or in facilitating financial transactions. Included are:

* establishments that are primarily engaged in financial intermediation. They raise funds by taking deposits and/or issuing securities, and, in the process, incur liabilities, which they use to acquire financial assets by making loans and/or purchasing securities.

* establishments that are primarily engaged in the pooling of risk by underwriting annuities and insurance. They collect fees, build up reserves, invest those reserves and make contractual payments. Fees are based on the expected incidence of the insured risk and the expected return on investment.

Sample Job Titles:

Financial Analysts

Financial Controller

Investment Researcher

Management Analysts

Purchasing Managers

Risk Consultant

Educational Services

The Educational Services sector comprises establishments that provide instruction and training in a wide variety of subjects. This instruction and training is provided by specialized establishments, such as schools, colleges, universities, and training centers. These establishments may be privately owned and operated for profit or not for profit, or they may be publicly owned and operated. They may also offer food and/or accommodation services to their students.

Educational services are usually delivered by teachers or instructors that explain, tell, demonstrate, supervise, and direct learning. Instruction is imparted in diverse settings, such as educational institutions, the workplace, or the home, and through diverse means, such as correspondence, television, the Internet, or other electronic and distance-learning methods.

Sample Job Titles:

Archivist

Career and Technical Education Teacher

High School Teacher

Instructional Coordinator

Instructor

Librarian

Postsecondary Teacher

Preschool Teacher

Supply Teacher

Entrepreneurship

It is abundantly clear that entrepreneurship is important for economic growth, productivity, innovation and employment, and many countries have made entrepreneurship an explicit policy priority. As globalisation reshapes the international economic landscape and technological change creates greater uncertainty in the world economy, entrepreneurship is believed to offer ways to help to meet new economic, social and environmental challenges.

Entrepreneurship has gained additional attention in the current economic crisis, as it is widely viewed as a key aspect of economic dynamism. Economic crises are historically times of industrial renewal, or creative destruction, as less efficient firms fail while more efficient ones emerge and expand. New business models and new technologies, particularly those leading to cost reductions, often emerge in downturns.

Sample Job Titles:

Architectural Manager

Civil Engineering Contracter

Construction Manager

Engineering Manager

Service Manager

Site Manager

Information Technology

Information technology (IT) is the application of computers and telecommunications equipment to store, retrieve, transmit and manipulate data, often in the context of a business or other enterprise. The term is commonly used as a synonym for computers and computer networks, but it also encompasses other information distribution technologies such as television and telephones. Several industries are associated with information technology, such as computer hardware, software, electronics, semiconductors, internet, telecom equipment, e-commerce and computer services.

In a business context, the Information Technology Association of America has defined information technology as "the study, design, development, application, implementation, support or management of computer-based information systems".

Sample Job Titles:

Computer Network Architect

Computer Programmer

Computer Support Specialist

Computer Systems Analyst

Information Research Scientist

Software Developer

Law Practice

Further education is required.

The legal services industry incorporates a range of services for clients requiring legal assistance. Opportunities are available in private practice, the public sector and in-house in industry and commerce.

Global recession and economic factors have resulted in law firms restructuring, downsizing and in some cases merging or closing. Further changes within the industry are emerging following the Legal Services Act 2007, enabling law and non-law firms to merge to form alternative business structures. Cuts within the Legal Services Budget have resulted in a reduction in firms offering publicly funded work being awarded contracts, putting greater pressure on the pro bono and voluntary legal advice sector.

Sample Job Titles:

Lawyer

Legal Advisor

Legal Assistants

Legal Researcher

Litigator

Paralegal

Management Consulting

Management consulting is the practice of helping organizations to improve their performance, primarily through the analysis of existing organizational problems and development of plans for improvement. Organizations may draw upon the services of management consultants for a number of reasons, including gaining external advice and access to the consultants' specialised expertise.

As a result of their exposure to and relationships with numerous organizations, consulting firms are also said to be aware of industry "best practices", although the transferability of such practices from one organization to another may be limited by the specific nature of situation under consideration.

Sample Job Titles:

Consulting Actuary

Insurance Adjuster

Investment Analyst

Management Analyst

Personal Financial Advisor

Statistician

Research

"Research" aims to generate knowledge in the hopes that it will help create or improve a product, process or service. "Development" converts research findings or other knowledge into a new or improved product, process or service.

In concrete terms, R&D brings new knowledge and processes to Canadian businesses — the new, higher value-added products, processes and services that Canada needs in order to thrive in a knowledge-intensive market. Innovative companies can offer skilled employment opportunities for Canada's knowledge workers.

Companies embarking on R&D projects need to adopt focused business strategies, obtain secure financing and undertake risk management.

Sample Job Titles:

Computer and Information Research Scientist

Economist

Market Research Analyst

Political Scientist

Sociologist

Survey Researcher

Other Industries

This section has highlighted a number of popular industries and job titles that align with your academic program; however, it was by no means an exhaustive list of all the possible options available to you with the degree you possess. Access the resources below to learn about other industries and job titles that are a fit for you.

Canadian Industries: Browse through over 900 Canadian Industries.

LinkedIn: Search through thousands of Western Alumni by degree.

National Occupational Classification (NOC): The national reference on occupations - organizes over 40,000 job titles.

Informational Interviews: Find out about jobs and career paths you never knew existed.

CareerCruising: Peruse career & further educational options (visit the "Resources" section of CareerCentral for the username & password).

Working in Canada: The leading source for labour market information in Canada.

US Occupational Outlook Handbook: Browse hundreds of occupational profiles.

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